Trump Claims Google Suppressed Bad News About Hillary Clinton

Trump Claims Google Suppressed Bad News About Hillary Clinton

Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on Wednesday claimed Google's search engine was biased in burying bad news about his rival Hillary Clinton.

Trump made the comment at a rally in Council Bluffs, Iowa, after mentioning a Google poll, which he said he was leading "despite the fact that Google's search engine was suppressing the bad news about Hillary Clinton. How about that."

Trump did not elaborate on what "bad news" he believed was being suppressed, though he typically appends "crooked" to Clinton's first name and has made her private email server a central talking point of his campaign.

Google did not immediately respond to a BuzzFeed News request for comment on the Republican nominee's latest allegation.

Though his claim that Google stacked the deck against him appears to be new, Trump has also repeatedly complained that the electoral system is, or could be, "rigged" against him. This summer he repeatedly warned of voter fraud, and put out a call for "observers" to watch polling places and safeguard against cheating.

After Monday's debate, Trump also claimed that his microphone was faulty and speculated that the alleged problem could have been intentional.

LINK: Trump Seeks Volunteer “Observers” To Stop Clinton From “Rigging” The Election

LINK: Trump Defends His “Rigged” Election Claim: “I Just Hear Things, And I Just Feel It”




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Amid Fears Of Russian Hacks, Officials Say The US Election Is Secure

Amid Fears Of Russian Hacks, Officials Say The US Election Is Secure

Afp / AFP / Getty Images

Less than a week after high-ranking lawmakers accused Russian intelligence agencies of trying to interfere with the presidential election, US officials have tried to offer a reassuring response: a cyberattack, they say, couldn’t change the outcome of the presidential election.

“I’m here to communicate one message — that message is that our elections are secure,” said Thomas Hicks, the chairman of the Election Assistance Commission (EAC), during a Congressional hearing Wednesday on election cybersecurity. Hicks said that our locally run election process, with each state managing its own systems, and comprising over 9,000 jurisdictions, presents an overwhelming obstacle to any would-be hacker.

Although hackers breached online election databases in Arizona and Illinois recently, Hicks stressed the difference between websites and voting systems. No voting machines in use are connected to the internet, he said. Hicks added that the attack on state systems served as a wake up call. “Instead of causing a national crisis, the breaches notified election officials across the country that they should be on high alert,” he said.

The EAC and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have been tasked with providing cybersecurity resources and guidance to state governments after the hacks in Arizona and Illinois, and the Democratic National Committee’s email hack in July.

"We have confidence in the overall integrity of our electoral system because our voting infrastructure is fundamentally resilient."

Andy Ozment, a top DHS cybersecurity official, agreed that our decentralized election system protects against outside interference. “We have confidence in the overall integrity of our electoral system because our voting infrastructure is fundamentally resilient,” he said during the same hearing.

Ozment acknowledged that parts of the US electoral system, just like any digital technology, are vulnerable to tampering. But “we have no indication that adversaries are planning cyber operations against US election infrastructure that would change the outcome of the election in November,” he said.

Several lawmakers referenced how Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Adam Schiff had publicly accused Russia of engaging in sustained efforts to influence the US election, but Ozment declined to comment. No member of the executive branch has confirmed that Russian agents perpetrated the hacks, nor have they pinned the attacks on any other entity.

"Attacks against voting machines are unlikely to have widespread impact... However, attacks or malfunctions that could undermine public confidence are much easier."

Despite Ozment and Hicks’ reassurances, experts during the hearing pointed to the glaring security flaws tied to dangerously outdated voting equipment that’s still used across the country, as well as paperless voting machines.

Andrew Appel, a computer science professor at Princeton University, urged election officials to abandon touchscreen machines that produce no paper record. This protects not only against deliberate and malicious interference, but also miscalibration and software bugs, he said during the hearing. Appel has demonstrated how it's possible to install a vote-stealing program onto a voting machine in 7 minutes using just a screwdriver.

“As the equipment gets older, we are more likely to see failures,” said Lawrence Norden, the deputy director of the democracy program for the Brennan Center for Justice and co-author of a recent study that catalogued the alarming state of US voting machines.

Norden doubts that a Kremlin-hatched election scheme could determine who ends up in the White House. But he expressed a different concern, echoing lawmakers like Feinstein and Schiff: Rather than manipulating vote tallies, tampering with voting machines could sow distrust in the electoral process.

“Attempted attacks against voting machines are highly unlikely to have widespread impact on vote totals this November,” he said. “However, attacks or malfunctions that could undermine public confidence are much easier.”



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VTIN VRazr wireless sport headphones: quality under $20 (review)

VTIN VRazr wireless sport headphones: quality under $20 (review)
Wireless headphones have certainly taken hold in the mobile accessory market. What was once highly limited to big brand names has now been infiltrated by unknown brands at ultra competitive prices. It’s been a personal quest of mine to review low-budget accessories because there are so many options that make a whole lot of sense.

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New Hampshire "Ballot Selfie" Ban Is Unconstitutional, Appeals Court Rules

New Hampshire "Ballot Selfie" Ban Is Unconstitutional, Appeals Court Rules

Mike Blake / Reuters

WASHINGTON — A New Hampshire law that forbids people from taking so-called "ballot selfies" is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court ruled on Wednesday.

"New Hampshire may not impose such a broad restriction on speech by banning ballot selfies in order to combat an unsubstantiated and hypothetical danger" of vote buying or voter intimidation, Judge Sandra Lynch wrote for the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals.

"We repeat the old adage: 'a picture is worth a thousand words.'"

The ACLU had brought a lawsuit challenging the law on behalf of three people investigated for alleged violations of the law during the 2014 election. At the appeals court, they were backed by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and Snapchat, among others.

In the key part of the ruling, Lynch wrote:

Read the opinion:



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Wednesday’s best tech deals and discount codes

Wednesday’s best tech deals and discount codes
Online security is more important these days than ever. Our dependance on the internet is at its highest and the amount of cyber theft is so high that even our presidential nominees are trying to address it. A VPN is a great way to secure your personal information and we are offering a lifetime subscription

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UMi Plus is redefining the concept of “4GB RAM flagship”

UMi Plus is redefining the concept of “4GB RAM flagship”
UMi Plus has been called the “budget flagship” because it’s able to give a no-compromise experience at a very convenient price, only 179.99$ for a phone which has the Helio P10 Octa core SoC, 4GB RAM, 4000mah Battery, PE+ fast charging technology and 13MP Samsung PDAF Camera with pure Andriod 7.0 update at this Christmas!

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Hovhaness AvoyanBritish people may not have heard a great deal about PicsArt, but we certainly found out a good deal about the firm at its office in Yeravan, Armenia earlier today.

The CEO, Hovhaness Avoyan – pictured – is a serial startup guy – this is his fifth startup and started up five years ago. The company has 200 people working in Armenia and 25 in San Francisco, its headquarters.

The firm got venture funding two years ago from the already famous Sequoia.

Its engineers are based in its Yeravan, Armenia engineering hub.

The company is doing pretty well, said Avoyan, and isn’t looking to be taken over.

“We’re on a growth part. We’re not looking at acquisition,” he said today. “We’re one of the largest in the social editing platform. Our biggest competitor is Instagram.”

It’s just about to shunt out a new version of PicsArts that uses artificial intelligence. Avoyan knows all about AI, he graduated in it way back when, but the new AI is a different kettle of fish.

“AI has become very practical,” he said.

He has some strong views about the lack of backing of Armenia’s IT sector by the government. “We’d like to see more investment in universities,” he told us today. The company is considering opening an office in the UK.



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The Best Bike Racks and Carriers for Cars and Trucks

The Best Bike Racks and Carriers for Cars and Trucks
saris bones trunk rack

After weeks of interviewing experts, testing more than 20 bike racks and carriers on several different vehicles, and surveying a couple hundred cyclists from across the country, we’ve found that there’s no one “best” bike rack for every rider. Which one is right for you depends on your budget, vehicle, bike, and personal priorities. That said, we feel the Saris Bones trunk rack is the best choice for cyclists who want to easily transport their bikes on almost vehicle and don’t want to spend a lot of money. It’s solidly built, ultra-light, affordably priced, easily stored, and an overall great value. That’s a combination that no other rack we tested can match. For riders who don’t mind spending more money and want a rack that’s easier to mount or provides more protection for the bike and vehicle, we have other great picks below.



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The Best Tripod for iPhones and Other Smartphones

The Best Tripod for iPhones and Other Smartphones
iphone-smartphone-tripods-lede

After researching 30 options and taking 13 legs and 13 mounts on the trails of the Pacific Northwest and through the streets of Seattle, we recommend the Joby GorillaPod Hybrid legs and the Square Jellyfish Metal Spring Tripod Mount as the best iPhone (and other smartphone) tripod and mount.



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Here’s What We Actually Know About What Gadgets Do To Our Bodies

Here’s What We Actually Know About What Gadgets Do To Our Bodies

For Cassandra Smolcic, the trouble began at her dream internship. Handpicked to spend a summer working on movies at Pixar, the 26-year-old logged marathon hours, and more than a few all-nighters, at her computer and tablet. At first, she managed to ignore the mysterious pinching sensations in her hands and forearms. But by the time her internship ended and a full-time job offer rolled in, she could barely move her fingers.

For Skylar, a 12-year-old in South Florida who loves her laptop, phone, and tablet, the breaking point came at the start of sixth grade last fall. Suddenly her neck, shoulders, and back felt strained whenever she rolled her head, as if invisible hands were yanking muscles apart from the inside. All her neck-rolling, she worried, made her look like she was trying to cheat off someone’s test.

To be a perpetually plugged-in, emailing, texting, sexting, swiping, Snapchatting, selfie-taking human being in 2016, a little thumb twinge is the price of admission. There are the media-anointed outliers: the Candy Crusher with a ruptured thumb tendon, the woman who over-texted her way to “WhatsAppitis.” And then there are people like the 18-year-old woman who said, “If I’m scrolling down Tumblr for more than half an hour, my fingers will get sore.” “When I hold my phone,” a 22-year-old complained, cradling her iPhone in her palm, “my bottom finger really hurts.” A 30-year-old software engineer said his fingers “naturally curl inwards,” claw-like: “I remember my hand did not quite use to be like that.” Amy Luo, 27, suspects her iPhone 6s is partly to blame for the numbness in her right thumb and wrist. Compared with her old iPhone, she said, “you have to stretch a lot more, and it’s heavier.” Dr. Patrick Lang, a San Francisco hand surgeon, sees more and more twenty- and thirtysomething tech employees with inexplicable debilitating pain in their upper limbs. “I consider it like an epidemic,” he said, “particularly in this city.”

“I consider it like an epidemic, particularly in San Francisco.”

To be clear, no one knows just how bad this “epidemic” is. At best, we learn to endure our stiff necks and throbbing thumbs. At worst, a generation of people damage their bodies without realizing it. In all likelihood, we are somewhere in the middle, between perturbance and public health crisis, but for the time being we simply don’t — can’t — know what all these machines will do to our bodies in the long term, especially in the absence of definitive research. What we do know is that now more people are using multiple electronics — cell phones, smartphones, tablets, laptops, desktops — for more hours a day, starting at ever earlier ages. But we weren’t built for them.

Source for computer injury prevention tips: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons / Via orthoinfo.aaos.org

Growing up in the Rust Belt city of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, Smolcic was the kid who was always sketching characters from movies and cartoons. And in her adolescent years in the ’90s, computers became an important tool for honing her artistic talents: She made clip-art greeting cards and banners, and high school newspaper layouts, on desktop computers. At Susquehanna University, she went all in on graphic design as a career after she took a computer arts course on a whim. That meant long hours on various iMacs, and even more screen time when she went on to earn a master’s in graphic design at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Over the years, she’s also carried a flip phone, a Motorola Razr, a Dell laptop, and, at the moment, a MacBook Pro and an iPhone 6s.

Smolcic in Hong Kong

Courtesy Cassandra Smolcic

Machines were crucial to Smolcic’s burgeoning artistic career, as they are to so many of our lives. But it’d be hard to call them human-friendly.

Consider the minimum biomechanics needed to work a smartphone. Put aside all the other risks — of getting depressed and lonely; of sacrificing sleep, hearing, eyesight, and focus; of dying while snapping selfies on cliffs, or texting while walking or driving. The act of just using the thing is precarious.

Our heads sit atop our necks and line up with our shoulders and arms, just as a two-footed species’ should. But a forward-leaning head shakes up this graceful arrangement: The upper body drifts back, the hips tilt forward, and pretty much everything else — the spine, the nerves below the neck, the upper limb muscles — tightens up. Slouching is all too easy when we hold a phone in our outstretched hand or reach for a mouse. When we type on our laptops cross-legged or sprawled on our stomachs, our necks and shoulders strain from leaning into the low screens. (Yes, as counterintuitive as it sounds, you probably shouldn’t put a laptop on your lap.)

Our hands are uniquely capable of grasping objects, a useful trait for our branch–swinging primate ancestors. Especially remarkable are our opposable thumbs, free to flex, extend, curl, and press in all sorts of directions. But their inherently unstable joints didn’t evolve to be constantly pushed beyond their range of motion. Yet they are when we flick through our phones or, worse, tablets.

Dr. Markison in his San Francisco office

Stephanie Lee / BuzzFeed News

To Dr. Robert Markison, it’s clear: Virtually none of Silicon Valley’s inventions, from the clunky Macintosh 128K of 1984 to the sleek iPhone 7, have been designed with respect for the human form. Markison is a San Francisco surgeon who depends on his hands to operate on other people’s hands. He so believes in technology’s potential to harm — and treats so many young startup workers who confirm that suspicion — that he almost exclusively uses voice recognition software. He also has his own line of smartphone styluses that double as pens, with colorful barrels made of manually mixed pigments, pressure-cast resin, and hand-dyed silk.

On a recent afternoon in his office, Markison asked me to make a fist around a grip strength measurement tool, with my thumb facing the ceiling. It felt powerful, easy. Then he had me turn my palm to the floor, the keyboarding stance of a white-collar worker, and do the same thing; my grip immediately lost a noticeable amount of strength. “There’s no reason to think a mouse is a good idea,” Markison said.

Of course, many people with office jobs probably suspect that already. During the ’80s and ’90s, when computers — then also known as “video display terminals” — invaded workplaces around the world, employees felt their arms and fingers go numb, and headlines warned of the harm these newfangled devices appeared to be inflicting. In the early ’90s, telephone operators, journalists, clerical workers, and employees from other fields filed hundreds of lawsuits against the manufacturers of equipment such as computer keyboards, which they blamed for severe arm, wrist, and hand injuries.

All that worry woke a generation up to the physical (and psychological) toll of automated, ultra-efficient work. Then came furniture and appliances to align technology with our bodies. Ergonomic mice are gripped vertically, and foot mice save clicks. Slanted and split keyboards let hands relax. Desks convert to a standing position or have adjustable split levels for monitors and keyboards. Some software transcribes speech, other software alerts your boss when you type too fast.

But these inventions have been largely for desktops. The dizzying rise of cell phones, tablets, and laptops, fueled by the rush to make screens ever more portable and ubiquitous, have all but left human-centered design principles in the dust.

Chances are good you’re reading this on your phone. In fact, chances are good your phone was the first thing you looked at this morning and the last thing you looked at last night. Wake up to a phone alarm. Scroll, bleary-eyed, through email, texts, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. Field more news and email on your phone on public transit (or, er, in the car). Sit behind a computer of some kind at work or school. All day your buzzing phone demands to be held, whether you’re out to lunch or, admit it, on the toilet. Come reverse commute, you’re once again head down on your phone, or an e-reader, until you finally take a break at home — by watching Game of Thrones on your laptop or tablet. Bonus points if you play Words With Friends while you do it.

Mark Davis / BuzzFeed News. Sources: New York Spine Surgery & Rehabilitation Medicine, Mayo Clinic, American Society for Surgery of the Hand

Last year alone, an estimated 164 million laptops and 207 million tablets were sold worldwide. Sixty-three percent of the world’s population had a mobile subscription; by 2020, more than 2.5 billion new smartphone connections are predicted to come online. We are surrounded by gadgets. Luo’s hand may hurt from holding her iPhone, yet her lifestyle leaves her little choice but to swipe and soldier on. “I have considered being on the phone less,” said the Twitter product designer, “but it’s kind of hard because it’s how I keep in touch with my friends and everything.” Her doctor told her to “absolutely stop” laptop work. Luo admits she doesn’t listen.

Eighteen hours, from waking up at 7 a.m. to going to bed at 1 — that’s how long Owen Savir, 35, says he’s on his Nexus 6P every day. (He keeps busy as the president of Beepi, an online car marketplace.) Savir’s pinkie sometimes goes numb under his phone, and the cover cuts his skin so much it needs a Band-Aid.

How would he feel, I asked, if his phone got taken away?

He paused. “I would use my other phone.”

“I have considered being on the phone less, but it’s kind of hard because it’s how I keep in touch with my friends and everything.”

Scientists don’t definitively know how all this activity affects our bodies. While some studies link hand ailments to heavy computer and video game use, far fewer have examined new devices like smartphones. “The phones have only been out 10 to 15 years at best,” said Jack Dennerlein, who directs the Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics Laboratory at Harvard University. “We haven’t had the long-term exposures to start seeing some of the more chronic issues that come up later in life.”

No reliable measurement of technology-related ailments exists. The closest thing is an annual survey of workplace injuries by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, whose data suggests that cases of musculoskeletal disorders, including carpal tunnel syndrome, have dropped over the last two decades. But these figures are at best “a very crude measure” of problems, said Dr. Kurt Hegmann, who directs the University of Utah’s Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health. As Dennerlein put it: “They’re better than nothing.”

Hegmann offers some theories for why the numbers are shrinking: High-risk jobs like manufacturing are decreasing. Panicked workers in the ’90s likely reported nonexistent ailments before the hysteria subsided. Some offices may have became more ergonomic. And there are other reasons the numbers are probably off: Non-work-related factors like obesity can contribute to carpal tunnel, and if you’re constantly sending work emails but also Instagramming for fun, it’s hard to blame your sore hand on work alone.

BuzzFeed News; Getty. Source: Surgical Technology International

However widespread phone-linked injuries may or may not be, a small cluster of studies suggests that they are real. A 2011 study of nearly 140 mobile device users linked internet time to right thumb pain, as well as overall screen time to right shoulder and neck discomfort. Another found that smartphone overuse enlarges the nerve involved in carpal tunnel, causes thumb pain, and hinders the hand’s ability to do things like pinch.

Upright, an adult’s head puts about a dozen pounds of force on the spine, according to a 2014 paper. But tilted 15 degrees, as if over a phone, the force surges to 27 pounds, and to 60 pounds at 60 degrees. (That’s the weight of four Thanksgiving turkeys.)

“It’s harmful when you’re younger, because the bones are still malleable and pliable and they may be disformed permanently,” said New York spinal surgeon Dr. Kenneth Hansraj, who wrote the paper after treating a patient “head down in his iPad, playing Angry Birds four hours a day.” Older people can suffer too, he said, because their spines are prone to narrowing, making them susceptible to injury.

But the doctor insists he’s no “cell phone basher.” “I love the ability to have a cup of coffee and contact 10 of my friends in 10 countries with one text and say, ‘I love this coffee,’” he said. “I’m just saying, my message is to keep your head up and be cognizant of where your head is in space.”



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What Killed The Blackberry?

What Killed The Blackberry?

Today, Blackberry announced it will no longer make hardware. Here’s the definitive history of the once-dominant smartphone’s downfall.

This is the original iPhone, a leading smartphone.

Apple

This is the iPhone 3G, which added 3G capabilities to the original iPhone smartphone.

Apple

Here is the iPhone 3GS, which added more speed to the iPhone 3G.

Apple

This is an image of the iPhone 4, the next in the series of the iPhone smartphone line. It had a new, better screen and was faster than its predecessor, the iPhone 3GS.

Apple


View Entire List ›



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Amazon refreshes the $40 Fire TV Stick with Alexa remote

Amazon refreshes the $40 Fire TV Stick with Alexa remote
Amazon has thrown their hat into the streaming device update ring. The refresh of the widely popular Fire TV streaming stick comes straight on the heels of Roku upgrading their entire line of streaming devices. Amazon has decided against a complete overhaul, however, and instead opted for marginal improvements in order to keep the device

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